Indy Connect RED Line Rapid Transit Plan

Rapid Transit lines are designed to build upon the local bus service in key, heavily traveled corridors. The Red Rapid Transit Line is under detailed study. Running from Carmel through downtown Indianapolis to Greenwood, serving key destinations such as:

  • Nora
  • Broad Ripple
  • Meridian-Kessler
  • Ivy Tech
  • Eli Lilly and Company

Indy Connect completed a more detailed study of the Red Rapid Transit Line in 2013 and will continue to move the line through Project Development and Preliminary Engineering Phase in 2015. This continues to prepare the region to apply for Federal funding to construct the project through the Federal Transit Administration at the appropriate time. Bus Rapid Transit is the recommended vehicle type for the Red Line.

The Red Line is 25 miles long and extends from Westfield in the North, through Downtown, to Greenwood in the South. It connects to key destinations including Carmel, Nora, Broad Ripple, Butler, the Children’s Museum, the IU Health Hospital Complex, Eli Lilly, and the University of Indianapolis.  The corridor connects some of the fastest growing population and employment centers in the region and serves one of the key commuting corridors.

Three Nora stations are recommended in the plan, preliminarily located at College and Marott Park, 86th and College, and 96th and College. Recommended station locations reflect a strength for future development potential, as well as highest demand for service, based on the amount of residential, employment, attraction, educational, or health facilities located within 1/4-1/2 mile of the identified intersections.

In addition, preliminary station design concepts have been created to help the community visualize how a potential station may function in certain areas.  The stations are intended to include sustainable, durable materials; have modular components to enable growth for special events or over time as demand increases; include amenities like seating, paying for your ticket at the station instead of on the vehicle, and real-time arrival information among others; and would vary in size to fit the context of the station area.

See the IndyConnect website for more information about the Red Line progress.

Nora’s PUPstop

The People for Urban Progress have brought IndyGo’s PUPstops to Nora. If you don’t know the significance of these bright yellow seats in Nora, here’s the scoop: they are salvaged Bush Baseball Stadium seats repurposed at bus stops throughout Indianapolis.

“After salvaging roughly 9,000 Bush Stadium seats in 2012, through a collaboration with Ecolaborative, RecycleForce, and Indianapolis Fabrications, PUP began working with IndyGo to begin installing refurbished seats at bus stops throughout Indianapolis. Before we started, of the nearly 4000 bus stops in Indianapolis, only 42 had a bench. Since then, we’ve added 31 PUPSTOPS, and are on track to reach our goal of 42 by the end of 2014. In two years, we will have doubled the number of benches at bus stops using a resource the city already had,” reads the PUP website.

Check out the People for Urban Progress website’s great information and to support the project.

Thanks PUP! We think its pretty awesome to have these historic PUPstop seats in Nora!

Image credit: PUPstop website.

Marott Park & Nature Preserve

Wooded 102-acre park including a nature preserve with trails, birdwatching & spring wildflowers.

The 84-acre preserve, encompassing most of Marott Park, is composed of an old second-growth mixed mesophytic upland forest in the north, and floodplain forest and successional fields along Williams Creek and the White River to the south. The park land was given to the City of Indianapolis by the Marott family to be used as a natural area. Ongoing restoration of the area includes removal of Amur bush honeysuckle and garlic mustard, which are problematic non-natives; erosion control, and hardwood restoration.

During the spring there is a nice show of wildflowers including rue anemone, wild ginger, bloodroot, mayapple, Solomon’s seal, wood poppy, trillium, and others. Some interesting trees here are Ohio buckeye, pawpaw, bur and chinquapin oaks, and rough-leaved dogwood.

Marott Park is an Indy Park and does not require an admission or entrance fee. The park is open from dawn until dusk year round.

Gear Up for the VEX Robotic Championship

The City of Indianapolis hosts the annual VEX Robotic Championship for elementary, middle school, and high school students. Students from the North Central High School and Northview Middle School Robotics Teams participated.

Indy organized the VEX Robotics Championship (IndyVRC) in an effort to help promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) initiatives within the city. As the global economy continues to move toward STEM-focused enterprises, Indy must continue to develop a future workforce to meet that need. The IndyVRC engages teams of students to design, build, and program a robot to compete against robots from other teams in a sports-like game.

The 3rd annual City of Indianapolis VEX Robotics Championship was a success with over 130 school teams competing Nov. 15 – 16, 2014. The STEM Fair was host to over 35 booths featuring hands-on STEM learning activities such as robot chess and mathematics pentathlon.

 

photo credit: IndyStar
video credit: City of Indianapolis

Off-street trail in Nora, Indianapolis

Indy’s Complete Streets Policy

On March 5, 2014, the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization – IRTC Policy Committee approved a complete streets policy for the Central Indiana region. How do those plans affect Nora?

Complete Streets are streets for everyone. They are designed and operated to enable safe access for all users. Pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, and public transportation users of all ages and abilities are able to safely move along and across a complete street. Complete Streets make it easy to cross the street, walk to shops, and bicycle to work. They allow buses to run on time and make it safe for people to walk to and from train stations.

Roadways that are planned and designed using a Complete Streets approach may include one or many of the following elements: sidewalks, bike lanes (or wide paved shoulders), special bus lanes, comfortable and accessible public transportation stops, frequent and safe crossing opportunities, median islands, accessible pedestrian signals, curb extensions, narrower travel lanes, roundabouts, and more.  A “complete” street in a rural area will look quite different from a “complete” street in a highly urban area, but both are designed to balance safety and convenience for everyone using the road.
For more information, see the following:
Or visit the Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization Complete Streets website.

Increased Regional Fraud Activities

From:  Gerardo Becerra
Crime Watch Coordinator – IMPD North District

There has been a recent increase in fraud activity in the Indianapolis metropolitan area and surrounding counties involving the Felony Lane Gang.

These incidents usually result from car break-ins, and purses and other identification documents left inside the vehicles being stolen. The suspects will figure out where the victim’s banks and addresses are, and will disguise themselves to look like the pictures in the victim’s ID (including wigs on multiple incidents). They usually negotiate checks or withdrawals from the victim’s accounts from the drive up window using the victim’s ID. The suspects will usually be driving a rental car and will have a lookout with them in the bank parking lot to alert if police arrives. Victims should immediately notify IMPD and their bank(s), specifically telling them their ID was stolen along with their checks and credit cards, and request a “fraud alert” be placed on their account.

Report Loss or Theft Immediately
Acting fast limits your liability for charges you didn’t authorize. Report the loss or theft of your card to the card issuer as quickly as possible. Many companies have toll-free numbers and 24-hour service for such emergencies. Once you report the loss of your ATM or debit card, federal law says you cannot be held liable for unauthorized transfers that occur after that time.

How to Limit Your Losses?
The Fair Credit Billing Act (FCBA) and the Electronic Fund Transfer Act (EFTA) offer protection if your credit, ATM or debit cards are lost or stolen.

Credit Card Loss or Fraudulent Charges
Under the FCBA, your liability for unauthorized use of your credit card tops out at $50. However, if you report the loss before your credit card is used, the FCBA says you are not responsible for any charges you didn’t authorize. If your credit card number is stolen, but not the card, you are not liable for unauthorized use.

ATM or Debit Card Loss or Fraudulent Transfers.
If you report an ATM or debit card missing before someone uses it, the EFTA says you are not responsible for any unauthorized transactions. If someone uses your ATM or debit card before you report it lost or stolen, your liability depends on how quickly you report it:

How to Protect Your Cards and Account Information?
For Credit and ATM or Debit Cards:

  • Don’t disclose your account number over the phone unless you initiate the call.
  • Guard your account information. Never leave it out in the open or write it on an envelope.
  • Keep a record of your account numbers, expiration dates, and the telephone numbers of each card issuer so you can report a loss quickly.
  • Draw a line through blank spaces on charge or debit slips above the total so the amount can’t be changed.
  • Don’t sign a blank charge or debit slip.
  • Tear up copies and save your receipts to check against your monthly statements.
  • Cut up old cards — cutting through the account number — before you throw them away.
  • Open your monthly statements promptly and compare them to your receipts. Report mistakes or discrepancies as soon as possible.
  • Carry only the cards you’ll need.

For ATM or Debit Cards:

  • Don’t carry your PIN in your wallet, purse, or pocket — or write it on your ATM or debit card. Commit it to memory.
  • Never write your PIN on the outside of a deposit slip, an envelope, or other papers that could be lost or looked at.
  • Carefully check your ATM or debit card transactions; the funds for this item will be quickly transferred out of your checking or other deposit account.
  • Periodically check your account activity, especially if you bank online. Compare the current balance and transactions on your statement to those you’ve recorded. Report any discrepancies to your card issuer immediately.

Gerardo Becerra
Crime Watch Coordinator – North District
Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department
Department of Public Safety
605 E Westfield Boulevard, Suite 100
Indianapolis, IN 46220

Crime Watch Website:
http://www.indycrimewatch.com

Polling Locations Changed

ATTENTION: Northview Middle School, Greenbriar Elementary, Allisonville Elementary, John Strange Elementary, and Crooked Creek Elementary will not serve as a polling location on November 4, 2014. Voters should confirm their polling location by visiting www.indy.gov/VIP or by calling (317) 327-VOTE (8683).

Information posted via MSDWT.

Admiring the ‘Arrows of Direction’ Sculpture

Maybe you’ve driven by it a thousand times…

Marting A. Nehrling (b. 1970, American)
Arrows of Direction, 1989
stainless steel
3 sections, approx. 84x60x39 in. each

This sculpture was the result of a design contest hosted by the Art Department at North Central High School. The artist was inspired by origami, and the folding shapes and skewed lines of the piece create directional movement, suggesting the various paths that graduating students will take in life.

The sculpture was funded by matching grants from the Washington Township School Board and the NCHS Class and Student Councils of 1989.

Nehrling, a native of Indianapolis, lives in Chicago and teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Northtown Trail Plan

The Northtown Trail is a proposed east-west greenway connection of the Indy Full Circle Greenways Plan. It completes the east-west connection between Fort Harrison State Park and Eagle Creek Park. Along its route, it connects to many neighborhood and community parks, greenways, residential centers, and commercial nodes. It also opens up new recreational access to the White River. Its central section would cross the southern portion of Nora, and includes a proposed trailhead at 75th Street at its intersection with the Monon Trail.

Although the Northtown Trail is new to the greenways master plan, the route had previously been identified in the Indianapolis Bikeways Master Plan as an east-west connection across the north side of the city. Bike lanes are already in place across the entire length and several small sections of sidepaths are either already in place or in the planning process. This plan elevates the design of these sidepaths to the greenways design standard.

Indy Full Circle Greenways Plan

Indy Parks and the Department of Public Works have released the approved Indy Greenways Full Circle Plan.  The master plan is the result of a year-long planning process that included extensive public engagement and input.  It outlines the long-term, comprehensive vision for trail and greenway development in the City.

82nd/86th St Commercial Connector Plan

Indianapolis is in the midst of a revolution in terms of constructing new pedestrian and bicycle facilities, whether they be sidewalks, bike lanes, or sidepaths. There is even a separate Bikeways Master Plan that identifies the long-term vision for providing greater connectivity for the entire city.

The strength of this plan is that it ties the greenway system into that larger system and in the end, this plan is intended to accept and connect to all of those different types of “connections.” During the master planning process, it was determined that a connection to the major commercial centers in the city was desired. One major commercial corridor is the 82nd Street/86th Street corridor extending east and west through Nora.

From the Keystone Fashion Mall, the proposed route crosses 86th Street at the western off ramp of Keystone Avenue and then follows the south side of the street another mile west to the Monon Trail. In this section of the route, the trail passes through residential areas and connects to North Central High School. At the Monon Trail, the route again crosses 86th Street and follows the north side of the street for 6.75 miles, passing several additional commercial centers and neighborhoods continuing to the Traders Point commercial center.

The 82nd/86th Street Commercial Connector provides an opportunity for the greenways to provide pedestrian and bicycle connections to several major commercial areas in the city. Its implementation would provide a unique type of experience in the city. This route is in the very early stages of conceptual development and will need additional study to determine the exact alignment and more detail on how this greenway is incorporated into this high-vehicular volume corridor in the safest manner possible.

Indy Full Circle Greenways Plan

Indy Parks and the Department of Public Works have released the approved Indy Greenways Full Circle Plan.  The master plan is the result of a year-long planning process that included extensive public engagement and input.  It outlines the long-term, comprehensive vision for trail and greenway development in the City.